Sátántangó

439 mins.
Directed by Béla Tarr
NR
Hungarian with subtitles
1994

Available through Thursday, May 28.
 

  • Ticket price: $14.99 for unlimited viewing within a 3-day rental period.
     
  • How to watch: Available to watch through the Vimeo app for Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV, and on IOS and Android devices, or through your internet browser.
     

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During our temporary closure, we're excited to bring you opportunities to watch new release titles on your home screen while directly supporting Amherst Cinema. When you watch these Virtual Cinema films at home, the cost of the digital "ticket" is split between the film distributor and Amherst Cinema—just like with a ticket purchased at our box office.


One of the greatest achievements in recent art house cinema and a seminal work of “slow cinema,” SÁTÁNTANGÓ, based on the book by László Krasznahorkai, follows members of a small, defunct agricultural collective living in a post-apocalyptic landscape after the fall of Communism who, on the heels of a large financial windfall, set out to leave their village. As a few of the villagers secretly conspire to take off with all of the earnings for themselves, a mysterious character, long thought dead, returns to the village, altering the course of everyone’s lives forever.

Shot in stunning black-and-white by Gábor Medvigy and filled with exquisitely composed and lyrical long takes, SÁTÁNTANGÓ unfolds in twelve distinct movements, alternating forwards and backwards in time, echoing the structure of a tango dance. Tarr’s vision, aided by longtime partner and collaborator Ágnes Hranitzky, is enthralling and his portrayal of a rural Hungary beset by boozy dance parties, treachery, and near-perpetual rainfall is both transfixing and uncompromising.

SÁTÁNTANGÓ has been justly lauded by critics and audiences as a masterpiece and inspired none other than Susan Sontag to proclaim that she would be “glad to see it every year for the rest of [her] life.” It currently resides at #36 on the Sight & Sound / BFI’s Critic’s Poll of the 100 Greatest Films Ever Made, tied with PSYCHO and METROPOLIS.

This is a new 4K restoration from the original 35mm camera negative by Arbelos in collaboration with The Hungarian Filmlab.